Why I won't be using Apple Pay during rush hour on London transport

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10 August 2015
Zilvinas Bareisis
I am finally a proud user of Apple Pay! It came to the UK on July 14th while I was away on holiday, but I managed to set up my first card even while I was abroad. And I was very proud and pleased when I got back and completed my first Apple Pay transaction. My experience has been more or less as expected. I got an email from American Express announcing that Apple Pay is available and suggesting that I should add my card to it. I have been using my Amex for iTunes, so adding it to Apple Pay was relatively straightforward. Somewhat unexpectedly, I now also get notifications on the phone for all transactions, including those made with a card - I would have thought Passbook would only have my Apple Pay transactions, but I guess it does make more sense to see all transactions on the card in the same place. I also added a debit card issued by my bank. The bank also promoted Apple Pay to me, and when I logged into my mobile banking app, Apple Pay was featured prominently at the top of the "home screen." Clicking on the banner took me to the screen within the bank app which explained about Apple Pay and had an "Add Card" button. Given that I was already inside the bank's app having authenticated myself via TouchID, I was expecting that this button would give me a list of the bank issued cards I have and I could add any of them to Apple Pay by just clicking on it. Somewhat disappointingly, I was taken out of the bank's environment into the regular Apple Pay "add card" process and had to scan my card, wait for the text message with a security code to arrive, and set it up just like I would have done with any other card. I can imagine that what I wanted is perhaps challenging technically, but it still seemed like an opportunity missed to "surprise and delight" me as a customer. When everything works as expected, the transaction experience is brilliant. However, I already expressed my concerns about the reliability of TouchID on these pages before, and they proved to be true - TouchID does not always work for me when trying to use Apple Pay. While this is not much of an issue in a retail setting, it is not something you want when fighting the crowds to get on a tube or train platform during rush hour in London. As Transport for London confirmed in response to a number of complaints about over-charging, you have to touch in and out with the same device throughout the day to ensure the correct fare is charged; touching in with Apple Pay and out with a card or Apple Watch might result in being charged twice, even though all payments might eventually come out from the same card. The other thing is that Apple Pay quickly conditions you to getting transactions confirmed on the phone. Because TfL has daily and weekly caps, it cannot confirm each transaction instantly. Instead, I was charged 10p when I touched in with Apple Pay, with the balance for the day's travel being charged to my card much later. While this is understandable and a minor gripe, it still contrasts with the experience of other transactions. None of this is TfL's fault, which deserves plaudits for continuing to improve and give options to how we pay for travel. However, while I will definitely continue to use Apple Pay at the retailers, I am going to stick with a tried and tested Oyster card or a bank contactless card when travelling in London. It is simply not worth fretting every time I approach the gates whether the technology will work at the speed needed to keep the crowds flowing.

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