Citadel Securities and the changing market microstructure

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16 May 2016
Anshuman Jaswal

The recent purchase by Citadel Securities of the assets of Citigroup's Automated Trading Desk business has further cemented Citadel's position as a leading market-maker. It follows closely on the heels of Citadel's acquisition of KCG Holdings' designated market maker business at the NYSE. Citadel has also been performing strongly in the swap markets in the US, specifically the swap execution facilities (SEF). It has built a reputation for reliability in difficult market conditions, at a time when broker-dealers are finding it difficult to maintain their market presence.

While the success of Citadel is noteworthy, it represents significant industry and regulatory undercurrents. Investment banks have labored under tougher market conditions and stronger regulatory restrictions. Firms such as Citadel have benefitted as they are not as tightly regulated as the banks. While this trend had been predicted in the years immediately after financial crisis, it is interesting to see the predictions coming to bear. The effect on the market structure has also been profound, and while many of the relevant developments have taken place in the US, other leading capital markets should also see similar changes in the near future due to similar economic and regulatory evolution. Investment banks will continue to narrow their focus in terms of their capital market presence, and we expect the leading ones to carve out specific niches instead ofmaintaining the comprehensive presence they had in the last decade.

From the buyside's point of view, while the lower presence of investment banks could indicate lower volumes and liquidity, it also represents a market in which there might be greater responsiveness to the needs of medium and smaller sized buyside firms.

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