Living with the Internet of Things (and crowd funding)

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23 April 2015
Craig Beattie
[avatar user="cbeattie@celent.com" size="thumbnail" align="right" /] Earlier this week some users of the Wink smart home hub found that their smart home hub was more useful as a door stop or brick than as a hub. A fix is being worked on and rolled out to customers but for me this looks like the teething problems of the still nascent Internet of Things movement and one of the hurdles Apple is trying to jump with the Apple Watch. Earlier this month I received a portable handheld scanner from Dacuda. It's not unusual for me to receive gadgets in the post but this one was particularly interesting to me as I had been one of the kickstarter funders of the item and have been following it's creation with some interest. It piqued my interest particularly because I'd seen the technology almost two decades ago in a research lab but not seen it come to market at a reasonable price - a scanner that one moves over the page and software builds a picture of the underlying document. This isn't the first item funded via crowd funding I've bought. My keys have a tile attached to them and I'm still wearing the original Pebble wrist watch (with e-ink display). I guess this firmly places me as an early adopter in the Internet of Things, wearables and crowdfunding space. I don't have a Wink hub although it's sort of appealing but not available in the UK yet. So far though it hasn't been all clear pastures and dreams ideally realised. The Internet of Things has it's teething problems. Let's take the Tile for instance, a small device that emits a bluetooth and short rage wifi signal so you can track it's location from a phone or tablet, thus, never losing it. I used to have 3 of them and now have 2, that's right I lost one. I was rushing out the door, the school run running a little behind schedule and forgot my phone. Somewhere on the brief journey I dropped the Tile and what it was attached to. Had I had my phone with me it would have given me the location of the last place it connected to the Tile, as it was it told me the last time it saw the Tile was at home. No matter, in theory if I retrace my steps I will come in range and be alerted that it is found. This didn't work either so I assume it was picked up. Since the battery lasts two years perhaps someone with the app will go near it and it may yet find it's way home - but not yet. Part user error and part an unfortunate series of events perhaps, but another technology found fallible and a dream not quite realised. The Pebble has been more successful. The fact I answer the phone when it rings is largely down to my smart watch rather than the phone these days and the wrist-borne notifications are hugely helpful. I use the misfit app on it to tell me I'm not doing enough exercise and a Withings smart body analyser at home to let me know the end result of not having done enough exercise - all great fun! I may still invest in the Apple Watch. I have a standing desk so do stand, something misfit on my pebble doesn't track and I feel I want to be recognised digitally for this at least. The little handheld scanner is more work in progress. My son's somewhat fascinated when it works and hugely interested in the errors it makes and where they are made - such is life as an early adopter. More teething issues there. No doubt though we as a population are moving to a world where anything we buy could be connected, where we can buy a $50 hub that controls our lighting from an app and it's failure is covered in the global (technology) press and where we can fund and follow the development of gadgets we've dreamt of owning for a couple of decades (even if the software needs a little more work). So what does this have to do with insurance? The fact is the Internet of Things appears to be running apace, smart homes are being tried out by the early adopters and bugs are being squashed. Did you know with the Wink hub, the app on your phone and this $40 quirky+ge water sensor you can get alerted in real time regarding escape of water events? Ever been out of the house and come home to find the kitchen, bathroom or basement flooded? Indeed just yesterday Karen pointed out this article suggesting insurers are getting involved with smart homes. There's a lot of buzz around health and life insurance in part driven by the Apple Watch launch. I'm looking forward to Apple doubling down on the HomeKit API or someone credible getting there first; I'm looking forward to the same boom around the Internet of Things and insurers handing out moisture sensors to home owners. I'm looking forward to prevention and intervention products, rather than selling services after a loss. Perhaps we just need to squash a few more bugs first.

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