Post-Brexit questions loom over Europe

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28 June 2016
Anshuman Jaswal

The post-Brexit environment is still quite hazy, but the politicians and regulators in the EU are trying to lay markers for future discussions and negotiations. There have been several comments that betray a fear of further demands for exits from the EU by the politicians and citizens of other countries that have high levels of Euro-scepticism, such as the Netherlands, France and Greece.
The French president recently stated that clearing for Euro-denominated securities would no longer happen in London and this "could serve as a lesson" to those who are questioning the need for the EU. Strong words indeed for a market that currently gets jittery at the drop of a hat. In a similar move, the president of the German financial regulator, BaFin, has also expressed doubts on the possibility of the LSE-DB merger if the resultant entity is based in London. The exchanges themselves have mentioned their intention to go on inspite of the added complexity due to Brexit, but I am sure they are keeping an eye on the political headwinds that are developing around them.
On their part, the British politicians and regulators are trying to calm the markets down and lull them into believing that little has changed in the aftermath of Brexit. The desire to delay invoking Article 50 to officially confirm UK's demand for exit is an example of this strategy, although EU leaders are opposed to this move. The claim by the politicans who supported Leave that there would not be any major and immediate economic or financial change after the referendum is another attempt of this nature.
While both these parties would probably be interested in discussing the issues that have arisen behind closed doors, in public they have to make the right noises to ensure damage control. There is also anger and resentment in the EU at the UK's decision and this shows from time to time in some of the comments. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has a very balanced attitude to Brexit, but she has also conceded that the UK cannot enjoy access to the EU single market the same way as it did earlier, something that was suggested by Boris Johnson. There is a genuine concern in the EU to prevent cherry-picking in this regard.
The various questions that have arisen post-Brexit will take a while to be answered. But what is clear is that there is going to be a significant parting of ways and the separation is going to be less than amicable, at least in public. For capital market professionals, in this landscape the discussion ends up being about political rather than economic or financial issues, in spite of trying otherwise. The latter have to take a backseat at time like this and this might continue for the weeks and months to come.

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