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Time to upgrade the call recorder? - 5 warning signals

11 September 2013
Isleworth, United Kingdom

Unless there is a major ‘forced change’ event, where the decision is made for you it is easy to continue to live with a call recording system that is substandard, difficult to use and expensive to keep. Here are 5 common instances’ that signal you should be considering an upgrade.

1. Incompatible with future plans – from a telephony perspective your recorder may not be able to handle a switch to IP or there may be resiliency issues if you are considering SIP trunking. Reduce unscheduled spend with a bit of forward planning and consulting with your call recording supplier to advise you on your best course of action.

2. Too many support issues – Although you may well have a maintenance contract, raising cases and reporting faults is an expensive and time consuming business and detrimental to the smooth running of the business and can be demoralising for support staff. If the same fault keeps re-occurring it’s usually symptomatic of bigger problems at play and that the shelf-life of the technology is fast diminishing.

3. Non-compliance – Keeping one step ahead of regulatory requirements is a constant challenge, whether it’s PCI Compliance or the Frank-Dodd act. With increasing clarity, not to mention fines issued in these areas, a range of cost effective solutions are emerging which your call recording provider should be able to advise you on.

4. End of product life – start the process now – It’s an obvious one, but we are constantly surprised at how many organisations get themselves into trouble by not replacing defunct recorders in an orderly and timely manner. Don’t wait until parts and licences become unavailable, the first notification from the manufacturer that the ‘Sunset Period’ is imminent is the time to act and get the best deal.

5. Nobody can work it – You may have inherited a system from another department, or lost all the people who knew how to use it through natural attrition. If the recorder in question is a bit long in the tooth this could signal a good time to upgrade to a newer, easier to use system, where knowledge retention and transfer may be more easily accomplished.

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