Shadow Banking Products in Europe and North America: Different Seasonings for the Alphabet Soup

by Medy Agami,  Joséphine de Chazournes, October 15, 2012
Product Trends/ Reviews
EMEA, North America

Abstract

Shadow banking remains a disquieting buzzword for regulators, who up to this point have not figured out how and when to regulate these entities. Presently, regulations acutely focus on “too big to fail” institutions, with broader scrutiny on other bank surrogates. This can result in a flight to shadow banking activities in order to secure liquidity that is imposed on firms by regulators, thus causing wrong way systemic risk.

 Some parts of shadow banking are more or less key in today’s economy and finance, according to the report Shadow Banking Products in Europe and North America: Different Seasonings for the Alphabet Soup. Shadow banking regulations are not final and sometimes overly political, but market infrastructure and trends also partly dictate what is there to come for these products.

The term “alphabet soup” reflects exactly what these activities are: various products put under the same umbrella but that operate differently, independently, with a logic of their own, with different risk management implications, different technological needs, and different business evolution and opportunities. With varied market impact as well as potential regulatory impact, one cannot have only one offering across shadow banking products, but instead should pick and choose which products to invest in and how to tackle them in a tailored way.

“The diversity of shadow banking products and the even more diverse problems that emerge from regulations reinforce that market players that want to develop solutions in these areas should really pick and choose their opportunities,” says Joséphine de Chazournes, Senior Analyst with Celent’s Securities & Investments Group and coauthor of the report.

“Under distress or severe abstruse circumstances, risks taken by shadow banks can easily be transmitted to the banking sector through direct borrowing from the banking system and banking contingent liabilities, such as credit enhancements and liquidity lines,” says Medy Agami, Analyst with Celent’s Securities & Investments Group and coauthor of the report. “Regardless, regulators cannot completely get rid of shadow banking markets since they provide liquidity to virtually every sector of the economy.”

This report outlines the regulations that impact shadow banking products in Europe and the US. It explains how different products are used, and highlights the risk management and technology advancement opportunities that various products may represent in the coming years.

This 29-page report contains 8 figures and 6 tables.

Celent is a research and advisory firm dedicated to helping financial institutions formulate comprehensive business and technology strategies. Celent publishes reports identifying trends and best practices in financial services technology and conducts consulting engagements for financial institutions looking to use technology to enhance existing business processes or launch new business strategies. With a team of internationally based analysts, Celent is uniquely positioned to offer strategic advice and market insights on a global basis. Celent is a member of the Oliver Wyman Group, which is part of Marsh & McLennan Companies [NYSE: MMC].

Media Contacts

North America (Boston)
Tylor Tourville
ttourville@celent.com
Tel.: +1 617 424 3284

Europe (London)
Chris Williams
cwilliams@celent.com
Tel: +44 (0)208 870 7875

Asia (Tokyo)
Yumi Nagaoka
ynagaoka@celent.com
Tel.: +81.3.3500.3023

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

1

Introduction

2

 

Definition of Shadow Banking

2

 

The Alphabet Soup: Different Products with Their Own Logic

4

Different Regulation

5

 

Shadow Banking and the Financial Crisis

5

 

Regulation of Banks That Create Imbalance for Non-Banks

5

 

Recent and Potential Future Regulation

6

Market Overview

14

 

Market Sizing

14

Different Usage of Different Products

19

 

Repo

19

 

Money Market Mutual Funds

19

 

Scheduled Securities (ABS, CDO, MBS, ABCP)

20

 

Securities Lending

20

Shadow Banking and Risk Management

21

Shadow Banking and Technology

23

 

Repo Technology

23

 

Collateral Optimization

24

 

Money Market Mutual Funds

25

 

Securitization Technology

25

 

Securities Lending Technology

27

From Shadow to Highlight Banking

29

 

Risk-Averse Market Players Come Back to Shadow Highlight Banking

29

 

Shedding a Light

29

 

New Shadow Banking Activities Emerge

30

Conclusion

32

Leveraging Celent’s Expertise

33

 

Support for Financial Institutions

33

 

Support for Vendors

33

Related Celent Research

34

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